Chutes and Ladders

Our Chutes and Ladders game has seen lots of use.  The spinner has long broken apart and the cheap card board playing pieces have torn in half from multiple instances of small hands grasping their middle and counting the squares off, hopping in each square as they are counted.  The game board had to be reinforced with packing tape because it almost tore in two.

Rather than toss this game in the trash, we’ve made it work.  Instead of the spinner with six sections we’re using a die which must land on the game board when tossed.  The cheap cardboard figures have been replaced with small game pieces of choice. Lego mini-figures are our preferred game pieces but any small figure will do.  It has made the game more personalized by far and it is fun to see an armed Star Wars Storm Trooper, a Lego Lady, and a Pokemon march up the ladders and slide down the slides.  What rejoicing when we land on a ladder and what lamentations when we land on a slide.

This is likely why my daughter doesn’t like the game very much.  She is devastated even when her Pokemon lands on the smallest slide.  If she lands on more than two or three slides during the same game, tears of frustration fall down her cheeks and she needs to be encouraged to continue to stay in the game.  My son remains optimistic after he encounters the slides and looks forward to the possibility of landing on a large ladder. The Storm Trooper adjusts his grip on his gun and waits for the next roll of the die confident he’ll land on a ladder eventually.

Chutes and Ladders is a counting game in which there are 100 spaces that need to be crossed before you land in the winner space in box 100.  Along the way are perils in the forms of slides. If you land in a box that a slide begins, you must slide all the way down. Some slides are very long and drop you down several rows down the board and some are short, just taking you back a few spaces.  The beginning of the slide always shows a child being naughty in some way and the base of the slide shows their consequence. The longest slide is for the child who reached high to sneak cookies. His consequence was falling to the ground and a broken cookie jar.  The smallest slide was for the child who went outside and walked through the rain with their shoes off. The result is a cold and three spaces back. The message: sneaking cookies is much worse than going outside with your shoes off.

The game designers placed two slides in boxes 48  and 49 where I succumb to the temptation of skating on thin ice or eating too many cookies (bad things happen with cookies in this game).  The other dangerous row is the last row. From boxes 91 to 100 there are 3 small slides that tempt you just before you get to the winners box.  We always hold our breath as we roll the die, hoping we avoid writing on walls, breaking windows with a baseball bat, or pulling a cat’s tail.

As there are equal slides and ladders, the fun part is when you get a ladder.  The bigger the better as it gets you closer to the finish in box 100. Happiness abounds when you help the cat out of the tree and go up from the 20s row all the way to the 80s row. The best ladder is when you land in the 80 box and shoot directly up two rows to the winners box.  Shouts of joy and happy dances occur when that happens.

The game takes only about 15 minutes to play and we get a lot of bang for our buck.  It lets my kids practice their counting and teaches perseverance. Character is built when the Storm Trooper and Pokemon have to go down a long slide and choose to stay in the game.  There’s nothing like instant cause and effect to illustrate what Stephen Covey says about our actions: “We are free to choose our actions… but we are not free to choose the consequences of these actions.” Sneaking cookies? You will fall down and have a broken cookie jar.  Help a cat out of the tree? You’ll have cat loving you, rubbing your legs, and go up 60 spaces. All in the time frame of 15 minutes and a die.