Zechariah Verses Abraham and Sarah

My daughter sees her brother enjoying a Drumstick ice cream cone sitting at the kitchen table and immediately asks for one.  She expects me to say yes and of course I will but sometimes I say no, just to see her reaction.  When she hears the negative “no” she makes a face, frowning and furrowing her brows, in a mock pout because she knows this game that I play and knows that she’ll get a Drumstick ice cream cone because it’s the fair thing to do.  It’s equal.

When I read about Abraham and Sarah’s reactions to being told they will have a child in their advanced years and compared it to Zechariah’s reaction to being told his elderly wife would have a child, I found it to be unequal and unfair.  Abraham and Sarah both laughed (Genisis 17:17, 18:12) to themselves in disbelief when they were told they were going to have a son in their advanced years.  Zechariah questioned the angel Gabriel who brought the news that he would have a son born to him in his later years (Luke 1:18).  What got me was that Abraham and Sarah did not have any consequences for their disbelief but Zechariah did.  Zechariah was not able to speak until John the Baptist was born.  This was an inconsistency, it wasn’t equal, it’s not fair to Zechariah that he was punished for his questioning and Abraham and Sarah weren’t.  How could God be unfair?

This is when I started thinking about equality verses equity.  As a teacher I know that if I did the same thing for all students, not everyone will necessarily achieve the goal.  Each student has different abilities and skill sets which is why equity can be a better idea of fairness.  Equity gives people what they need to be successful.  Equality and equity can be a confusing comparison to make, the words sound the same, and they say almost the same thing.  The graphic below is a good illustration of equality verses equity (Interaction Institute for Social Change | Artist: Angus Maguire).

Image result for equality vs equity

Maybe Zechariah needed that rebuke to get him to believe he and his elderly wife will have a child together whereas Abraham and Sarah did not.  This is where faith comes in that God has their best interests at heart and that He is very purposeful in what He does.  Equity is personal and requires that someone recognize what an individual needs in order to be successful.  It’s amazing that God loves us so much that He doesn’t just think about equality but also equity.

 

 

Bible.In.1.Year:The Three Mighty Men

The “begats” finally let up after chapter 9 and now the book of 1 Chronicles is giving a history of King David and Solomon.  The stories that I’ve read about in 1 Chronicles sound like they belong in an old book of legends like “The Adventures of Robin Hood” or “King Arthur and His Knights of the Round Table” because there’s all sorts of battles that are recorded and deeds done by “mighty men.”  The best story is one about three mighty men who overheard King David say how much he longed to have a drink from the spring of water in Jerusalem but the Philistines held the city and it was impossible (1 Chronicles 11:15-19).  Not for these nameless three mighty men!  They came together and broke through the stronghold of the Philistines to get the spring water and returned, unscathed, to King David and offered the water to him.

King David didn’t say “Thank you” to these three mighty men and then took a drink, maybe offering the three men a taste for their trouble.  I would have done that.  No, King David showed why he was a king, he took the spring water and poured it out to the Lord.  What a striking way to acknowledge God.  David took what he wanted the most, a drink from a spring in Jerusalem, and sacrificed it to God.  What an example of humility and sacrifice to God.

When I get a gift that I’ve longed for, my first thought is how much I will enjoy it, how much I deserve it.  King David shows us an example of how to be unselfish and how to give freely.  It’s also interesting that the three mighty men are anonymous, their deeds certainly deserve to be recorded, breaking through the Philistine’s stronghold and bringing back water is a notable act.  But their names weren’t recorded in the account in 1 Chronicles.  Being nameless emphasizes their actions were to honor their king and not bring honor to themselves.  It’s another example of selflessness, honoring someone else above yourself.

 

Reading the Bible in a Year

I’ve been an avid Bible reader for a long time and I believe that it is the inspired word of God, useful for teaching and correcting (2 Timothy 3:16-17).  While I’ve read the New Testament many times over I can’t say that I’ve read the Bible in it’s entirety.  I think I’ve missed some Old Testament stuff and I know for sure that I haven’t read any of the “begats” the lineage found in chapters upon chapters of some books of the Bible.  Since I believe that the whole of Scripture is worth while I decided that I should try to read the whole Bible.

My husband for Christmas gave me this beautiful olive green Bible with my name engraved in the bottom right in gold script.  It’s an ESV Study Bible and is about 2-3 inches thick, chock full of notes, commentaries, full-color maps, and in the last few pages, a year-long reading plan.  This reading plan is different than the others I’ve seen because it gives four sections of reading for each day: the Psalms and Wisdom Literature, the Pentateuch and history of Israel, the Chronicles and Prophets, and the Gospels and Epistles.  The fact that there’s a sampling of four different types of books in the Bible appealed to my dynamic personality.  I like to change things up: my nail polish is changed weekly, I like different hand soaps at my sinks, and I enjoy wearing diverse kinds of earrings.  Plugging through the Bible a book at a time, is dreary to me, and I’ve tried it, never making it past Exodus.  By the time I’ve made it through Genesis I’m exhausted.  I’m hoping this new reading plan will help with that.

I know that I will likely not make it to reading the four sections every day and so I will give myself grace when (not if) I miss a day.  I bought a spiral notebook and wrote down, in advance, the week’s readings in a section, undated.  The reading plan in the Bible broke the readings into days and has everything laid out from January to December.  I’ve taken liberties with the plan as I’ve started it on July 1.  I figure the first of July is a reasonable alternative to the first of the year.  The year begins for me in August since I’m a high school teacher, what’s one more month back for the beginning of the school year?

I’ve made it through the first week and have already got a lot out of it.  The introduction to the Daily Bible Study Reading Plan in my ESV Study Bible says that I ought to “…Pray(ing) to the Father that the Spirit will take what all the Scriptures teach about Christ and apply it to your mind and heart and life.”  I have been doing that and I’ve found throughout this week for it to be the case.  I’ve read scriptures this week that my spirit found comfort in and reassurance.  “But you, O Lord, are a shield about me, my glory and the lifter of my head.” (Psalm 3:3).

I did make it through the first seven chapter of Chronicles without my eyes glazing over too much.  This is one of the books with all the “begats” and lists all the descendants of many, many, people, most of them men.  I perked up whenever the Chronicler mentioned the sister of so-and-so, and I wonder why she was mentioned.  What special thing did she do?  In exasperation on the first day after reading 1 Chronicles 1, I looked in my ESV’s “Introduction to I Chronicles” to find out what the point was for these lists upon lists of descendants. I counted 23 names in a list of descendants one time and thought how impressive that is.  I don’t know 23 of my ancestors!  Why would this be in the Bible?  According to the ESV’s “Introduction of I Chronicles” the point of all those lists of ancestors is to remind the newly-returned exiled Jews that they are still people of God.  It was to remind them of where they came from as I’m sure they had trouble remembering, being in captivity for all those years.

I’m excited to continue this reading plan and see where the Holy Spirit takes me.  This year-long plan may take me a year and a half but I’ll get through it.  The key is to do my reading the same time everyday: in the morning before I start my day.

Here is a link to the ESV Daily Bible Reading Plan that I’m following.  It is meant to be cut into four bookmarks and each reading checked off of as you go and starts on January 1.  I’ve started only a week ago and chose to write down the day’s listing in an undated notebook so I can read the selection and not get confused about the dates or give myself grace when I miss a day.